Corsair Carbide 600C Inverse ATX PC Case Review

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Corsair Carbide 600C Inverse ATX Mid-Tower Case

Corsair spent most of it’s infancy as a DRAM memory maker and made a name for itself in this arena by becoming one of the premier makers of consumer PC memory. They later diversified and started making other PC related products like flash memory storage devices and high quality power supplies. In 2014, they launched their gaming brand along with peripherals such as keyboards, mice and audio products. Before that, they started into the crowded computer case market to which their offerings have been very warmly accepted by the PC building community. If you check many enthusiast publication lists of system builds, quite often Corsair cases are the chassis of choice in budget systems all the way up to high-end systems. In fact, I can state up front that I personally own two systems built Corsair cases – one is built in a black Graphite 600T and the other with a white Carbide 500R. Each have been excellent system chassis that I purchased a few years ago and have given me no issues to date so I have high expectations going into this review. As it happens, I recently damaged the singular front USB 3.0 port on my Graphite case when I banged into an inserted USB stick (I’m shocked this doesn’t happen to me more often) so when Corsair offered us the chance to give the new Carbide case a look, I promptly volunteered.

Corsair Carbide 600C

There are actually many variations of the Carbide cases outside of this newest model. Some are more budget friendly while others are smaller form factors or high air flow models. The new 600C/600Q cases are the top tier models in the Carbide lineup and are mid-tower sized and are geared towards those who typically have components that demand the extra space such as high-end graphics cards and water cooling. There are two variations of this with the 600C having the clear acrylic window in the side panel and the 600Q which skips the window in favor of sound dampening panel. Obviously, the clear 600C version caters to the bling crowd who like to show off their rigs and the quiet 600Q will woo those with a desire for low noise while providing ample cooling. We received the 600C version to check out.

While much has changed with this iteration of the case, the biggest change is probably the inverted placement of the motherboard which is a first for Corsair. This has it’s pros and cons as I’ll get into but it better shows off the GPU, which is now oriented so the heatsink is facing up and more visible than the dull PCB board on the back being the prominent view as in most typical cases. It also allows them to keep the top of the case closed off without negatively impacting case temperatures.

Corsair Carbide 600C/Q Mid-Tower ATX Case Features and Specifications:

Form Factor ATX
Retail SKU 600C CC-9011079-WW
600Q CC-9011080-WW
MSRP 600C $149.99 + tax/€149.99 incl. tax
600Q $149.99 + tax/€149.99 incl. tax
Dimensions (H x W x D) 454mm x 260mm x 535mm (17.87” x 10.24” x 21.06”)
Drive Bays Front 2x 5.25” tool-free (hidden behind door)
Internal 3x 2.5” tool-free, 2x 2.5”/3.5” tool-free
Cooling Front 2x 140mm AF140L fan (only one installed in 600Q; extra fan included in accessory kit)
Rear 1x 140mm AF140L fan
Top
Side
Bottom Supports up to 3x 120mm fans or 2x 140mm fans
Radiator

Support

Front Up to 240mm/280mm
Rear Up to 140mm
Top
Side
Bottom Up to 280mm/360mm
Expansion Slots 8
I/O Port 2x USB 2.0
2x USB 3.0
Headphone and mic
3-channel, 3-speed fan controller
Power Supply Standard ATX (not included)
Clearances Heatsink 200mm
PSU 210mm
Graphics 370mm
  • Drive and PSU shield – Two tool-free 5.25” drive bays, two tool-free 3.5” drive bays, and the power supply all hidden by a stylish, removable shield
  • Side-vented fascia – Clean front panel hides side openings, dampening sound while maintaining airflow
  • Dual 120mm/140mm or 240mm/280mm radiator support – Comes with two 140mm fans (only one installed in 600Q), but allows for mounting a radiator
  • Inverse ATX layout – Inverting the ATX standard allows users to show off their hardware, provide direct airflow on hot components, and seal the top of the case, preventing noise from escaping
  • 120mm/140mm fan mount – Comes with one 140mm fan with support for up to 140mm radiators
  • Up to 360mm radiator support – Install up to three 120mm fans, two 140mm fans, or a 240mm/280mm/360mm radiator, with open mounts for adjustable fitment
  • Hidden power supply bay – Removable bracket allows you to slide the power supply into the rear of the chassis, where cabling is hidden from the primary chamber
  • 2x USB 2.0, 2x USB 3.0, and 3-speed fan controller – Multiple USB ports on the top of the case and an integrated switchable three-speed, three-channel fan controller
  • Rear-loading 3.5” drive trays – Tool-free 3.5” acoustically-dampened drive trays concealed in primary chamber
  • Rear-mounted 2.5” drive trays – Tool-free 2.5” drive trays arranged behind motherboard

Corsair Carbide 600C Bottom

The case was packaged nicely in a fabric bag and nestled in the usual Styrofoam blocks to cushion its journey. The acrylic panel and control panel were each covered with clear plastic for an extra measure of protection. Though the box looked a little dinged up from transit, the case itself was undamaged and in perfect condition.

Corsair Carbide 600C AccessoriesAlong with the case was a manual and the usual assortment of screws for the motherboard and drive bays.

Corsair Carbide 600C ManualThe manual also provides a nice exploded diagram of the case for reference. Let’s have a closer look!

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  • I am about to build on this case and I am still not sure if I should put the H115i’s radiator as you did (exhausting) or as intake. I would prefer it to be exhausting, but then we may have negative pressure inside the case, since we would have only the 2 front intakes vs 3 exhausts. I may end up mounting the radiator to the front (if possible) as intake and then transfers those 140mm to the bottom as intake as well. ahhhh… what to do? blow hot air to the videocard or have negative pressure? LOL

  • KPunch

    It would be nice to see what the case looks like from the outside, with the door closed, with components installed…

    • Nathan Kirsch

      KPunch, that doesn’t sound like a bad idea. Sorry for the oversight and we will be adding one!

      • KPunch

        Awesome, thanks. Pretty interesting case.