Lexar Professional 2000x 128GB SDXC UHS-II/U3 Review

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Lexar Professional 2000x 128GB SDXC UHS-II/U3 Conclusion

Lexar currently has the only 2000x UHS-II card in the 128GB capacity maxing out the transfer rate of this spec.  That is a very impressive feat that this photographer really appreciates.  A SD card with 128GB means you can go on vacation with the family and shoot for seven days without having to say “hold on to that once in a lifetime pose while I change cards”.  Unfortunately the camera industry is behind and confused on which next generation memory card standard they want to support.  Canon’s latest top of the line camera, EOS 1DX Mark II announced as of this writing, has a CF and CF FAST 2.0 slot but a SD slot absent.  The Canon 5Ds(r) released a few months ago have a SD and CF slot, but only support UHS-I on the SD side.  Nikon went a different direction with their latest flagship D5 supporting both CF UDMA-7 and the new XQD memory format that is even faster than UHS-II.  Good news to those that own a new Nikon D500 since it has both the SD UHS-II and XQD slots.

Lexar-128GB-2000x-contents

The speed tests we have seen online show that Lexar is the king of speed and capacity regardless of the format and our testing demonstrates this in the SDXC 128GB 2000x space.  If you shoot with a camera that supports SD, this is a great card to have even if it only records at UHS-I speeds since it will speed up the download after the shoot.  However, given the current market confusion and lack of support for UHS-II it would probably be wise to save the $229.99 shipped and wait for a little more memory card dust to settle before jumping on this format.  Lexar still gets a recommended award for being the best in this category for speed and capacity.

 

LR Recommended Award

Legit Bottom Line: For devices that use SD,the Lexar Professional 2000x 128GB SDXC UHS-II/U3 is the king of speed and capacity in the UHS-II format.

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  • anon

    This kind of reviews should include an endurance test.

    • Bill Hentschell

      Since we only received one unit, an endurance test would not be a statistical sample. Further, most SD cards cycle into the 100,000 and was shown back in 2012(http://forum.embeddedarm.com/showthread.php?3-SD-card-endurance-test) that after months on 40 cards of max read/write they couldn’t get them to fail. Therefore, an endurance test on SD cards doesn’t really tell us much other than they will likely last for 10+ years under typical conditions as manufacturers suggest.