Intel To Release Broadwell Processor Before Christmas

During Intel’s most recent quarterly conference call Intel’s CEO, Brian Krzanich, said that he expected his customers would launch 14nm Broadwell-based products in the second half of 2014. It appears that Brian Krzanich sat down with Reuters during the Maker Faire in San Mateo, California and discussed how the 5th Gen Core ‘Broadwell’ processor series is doing. Reuters is reporting that Intel Broadwell processors will ship in time to be used in personal computers sold during the holiday season.

“Intel Corp’s next-generation Broadwell processors will ship in time to be used in personal computers sold during the holiday season but probably won’t be available for back-to-school shopping” -  Brian Krzanich, Intel Chief Executive Officer

If you were looking to build a new PC during the back-to-school shopping season it looks like you might be out of luck if you were waiting on Broadwell based platforms to come out. 

“I can guarantee for holiday, and not at the last second of holiday,” Krzanich reassured in a Reuters interview. “Back to school – that’s a tight one. Back to school you have to really have it on-shelf in July, August. That’s going to be tough.”

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  • Ronnie

    nice…. Broadwell is pointless for desktops as it will provide from none to very little CPU bump and that’s it and power consumption which is not a concern for a Desktop PC… since Irish Pro won’t be beneficial in Desktops, Broadwell will be a great cpu in notebooks tho, so in other words… forget about Broadwell, wait for Skylake or Haswell-E(if you really need it)

    • basroil

      You mean gaming desktops for ALL of your comments. For the average user, Broadwell will be a great thing, lowering electrical costs and letting you do video and photo editing much faster than before.

      • Eita.K

        “Much faster” Intel being Intel will only improve IPC by 5%.

        • basroil

          Most people are still using Core 2 or first gen Core i series chips, that’s where my comment came from. The performance boost between a quad core Core 2 2.5gh and a Core i5 Broadwell is likely to be in the mid three digit range, while still consuming less than a quarter the energy on average (peak not that different, but idle is much lower).

      • Ronnie

        of offense but your comment made very little to none sense, obviously I’m refereeing this to people who already have some kind of recent gen. CPU, such as (haswell, ivybridge-e or even some high-end sandy bridge) if one has one of these Broadwell is totally pointless at that point, what goes about electrical usage 2$ less electrical bill end of the month won’t make my life any happier, these power consumption thing is good for portable devices not personal computers, if you buy one of these cpu then it’s safe to assume you’ll be running some high-end gpu, a lot of ram, ssd, mobo etc… so if you could afford all that 2$ less bill won’t make your life happier for sure. and that “much faster” part was absouetely absurd lol… if you follow Intel products you should know that 3-4 gen back cpu is only maximum 20% slower at IPC than current ones, so anything has to do with Intel can’t be assosicated with “much” because they take baby steps due to no competition from AMD, that said todays top teir K haswell is just 16%IPC faster than 4-5 yr old Sandy…

        • basroil

          “your comment made very little to none sense, obviously I’m refereeing this to people who already have some kind of recent gen. CPU, such as (haswell, ivybridge-e or even some high-end sandy bridge) if one has one of these”

          1) Lexical, grammatical, and syntax errors make your response almost impossible to read, let alone make sense of.

          2) You are referring to a tiny portion of the population that exists almost entirely within the population that comprises the gaming community.

          Normal people don’t upgrade desktops often, not even memory or graphics. Most of the people I know that are considering an upgrade are still stuck in the Core 2 or perhaps early Core i cycles, both of which see massive improvements in power and performance in common applications. Even a Core i3 from the Haswell line can easily beat out a Core 2 Quad chip in all metrics, and any full fat i5 can do photo and video editing faster than an i7 920 (from experience, I have Core Duo, Core 2 Duo, Core 2 Quad, 920, 330m, 2600, and 3570, as well as both Sandy Bridge and Harpertown on xeon side)

          Considering PC upgrade cycles for most people is 5-7 years (average failure time), they will certainly see a marked improvement.

  • Terry Perry

    Once DDR4 Ram and M.B. and the newer SSD hit in 1st Q of 2016 all this stuff will be out dated again. The rumor is a 3.5 6 core for 350.$ with DDR4 ram will be as fast as the 1,000 $ 6 Core. Which will be the New 8 Core at 1,000 $ because the 6 Core are 8 Cores 2 Cores were shut off because of the MB’s having problems with DDR 3 not being fast enough at the time. I’m saving up my 2500 will just have to do.

    • Eita.K

      Huh? Servers use the same DDR3 and in fact even slower DDR3 and they had the full 8core or now the 12core. The reason Intel cut down the 8-core to the 6-core is because of binning processes.

      • basroil

        Binning + the fact that nobody really needs more than 4 cores when most programs are single thread limited (music, DX11, etc). Intel would rather have a 4 core 4ghz processor than a 12core 2gh one if the thermal limits are the same, since most people would get better performance

        • Eita.K

          And are those people able to max out a 4core 3ghz either? Ask yourself that. The only taxing apps these days are multi threaded games OR badly written games like WoW

        • basroil

          They are able to max out one core of a chip like that when ripping cds or playing bejeweled (assuming it still doesn’t have an fps cap). Point is that GHz and single thread flops are more important than multithread performance for most people.

  • anon

    who the hell wants an unlocked cpu with iris pro on desktop?

    • Eita.K

      Definitely not me :lol: If I was gonna spend 300$ on a mobo and 500$(or more considering it’s a iris pro) on a CPU I won’t be using their iGPUs what with their shit drivers and terrible quality to increase performance

      • Jonathan

        Iris Pro gives a 128 MB L4 cache which can give tangible performance boosts in certain workloads. It’s not the IGP enthusiasts want, it’s that huge, fast L4 cache.

        • Eita.K

          Thing is, more cache does not equate more performance.

        • Jonathan

          Actually it does depending on your workload. Much higher bandwidth than the RAM so it gives you less of a chance of missing the cache and having to go to RAM. Many workloads won’t notice and improvement but certain ones will notice a significant improvement.