AZZA Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower Case Review

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Internal Impressions (Continued)

Azza Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower

Azza chose a very odd tool-less mechanism for the 5.25″ Drive bays that I feel is rather cheap. It also is hard to work with, as it either hooks in all drives, or unhooks all. No way to operate on one bay device at a time. Thus, it’s rather clumsy to use.

Azza Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower

Using screws to secure the ODDs is out of the question as these clips block you from doing so. Though, they do not really hold the drive bay in place. AZZA should have skipped this system all together and included screws as they would have been much easier to work with.

Azza Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower

If you remove the top panel you can see they had the idea of giving you space to mount a radiator up top. Though, you are limited to 25mm thick radiators or fans. Any thicker will not allow the top of the case to close back up.

The hole spacing for these 2 x 120mm spots does not match common radiators like the Swiftech QP220 or the Black Ice SR1 2 x 120mm. So I do not know which Radiator Azza used for this spacing, but the two I have just do not work.

Azza Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower

Behind the front panel are 2 LEDs inside a tube to amplify and spread the light from the LEDs to give the front of the case that ambient glow. These are powered by the 5v rail of the PSU via a 4pin molex pass through connector.

Azza Toledo 301 ATX Mid Tower

Finally, here’s the side panel of the case, with its 230mm fan. While this is one of the most densely populated fans I’ve looked at in this size category, its overall shape makes it look like it could be loud. The blade design, plus the number of blades, could be both a pro and a con for it depending on the max RPM of the fan. Too high and it could be very loud; too low, and it won’t push any air. We’ll be testing this fan and the 120mms in the coming pages.

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