Thermaltake Element G Gaming Case Review

Jump To:


Internal Impressions

The first thing I noticed when I took a look at the inside was the finished interior. It adds a real clean look to the case. Though as nice as it looks, there is no window on the side panel. It most likely will never be seen unless, of course, you tend to leave the panel off like I so frequently do.

ThermalTake Element G

Below you can see cage for the hard drives. The hard drives simply slide into place once you put the screws in the side of the drive.

ThermalTake Element G

Something that has bothered me in the past about mounting the power supply on the bottom is the fact that heat rises. As hard as I have tried I just haven’t been able to change the laws of physics. Heat will always rise. What ThermalTake has done with the Element G was to help direct the airflow coming from your power supply. With the shroud in place over the power supply it helps to redirect the airflow. It should help keep the hot air off of the other components in your system.

ThermalTake Element G

Without the side panel on you can see two of the exhaust fans and one of the intake fans. The rear exhaust is a 140x140x25 mm fan that runs at 1000rpm. This is the only fan that is not adjustable by the fan control knob on the top of the ThermalTake Element G. Both the top exhaust and the front intake are 200x200x20 mm Touchcolor fans. These two fans are adjustable between 600 and 800rpm and rated at 12-14dBA.

ThermalTake Element G

The fan on the side panel is only slightly different than the other touch color fans. It is a 230x230x20 mm Touchcolor fan which is adjustable within the same range (600-800rpm) and is very slightly louder at 13-15dBA.

ThermalTake Element G

One thing that I was slightly disappointed in was the expansion slot covers. Aside from the top one they are all break away covers. Granted, this doesn’t take away from the quality of the case, but for an MSRP of $149.99 I would have liked to have seen more like the top cover.

ThermalTake Element G

Let’s move on to see how the ThermalTake Element G looks with a system installed.

Print
Jump To:

Comments are closed.