Azza Inferno 310 Mid Tower Case Review

Azza might not be one of the most recognized names in the PC industry, however they have been in business for over 20 years while distributing hardware under their own name since 2009.  Focused on gaming products, their product line includes power supplies, keyboards, mice, monitors and PC cases.  Azza strives to provide hardware to meet the needs of PC gamers while still keeping it affordable. [caption id="attachment_198557" align="aligncenter" width="633"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case[/caption] Last year was definitely the year of Tempered Glass on cases, this year everybody is integrating RGB into everything possible.  Azza has recently released a mid tower ATX case that includes both of these elements in the Inferno 310.  At a quick glance at the specs, we see that the Inferno 310 includes three 120mm fans, RGB controller, a tempered glass side panel, support for ATX motherboards, long graphics cards (up to 380mm), up to 360mm AIO liquid cooling, USB 3.1 Gen 1 and a 5.25" device bay, with an $89.99 price tag.  There are also a ton of promotions going on for the Inferno 310 right now. For example if you purchase it before October 31, 2017 there is a $20 rebate available too and if you use promo code AZZAOCT17 there is 10% off that expires October 23, 2017. If you happen to buy this case today you'll get get it shipped to your door for $60.99 after rebate! [caption id="attachment_198457" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid Tower Case[/caption] [caption id="attachment_198458" align="aligncenter" width="518"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Packaging Information[/caption] Packaging for the Inferno 310 is pretty standard a brown cardboard box with plenty of information on it to allow the consumer to know what they have, should you happen to find it in a retail location.  On the front (and back), you get a picture of the case which really doesn't do it justice.  On the two side panels, Azza has placed the detailed specifications. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mnp6V5tJh2M Features and Specifications:
Azza Inferno 310 Specifications
Model Name Inferno
Model Number CSAZ-310
Type ATX Mid-Tower
Color Black (exterior) / Black (interior)
Side Panel Tempered Glass with Rubber Mounts
Max CPU Cooler Height Up to 155mm
Max VGA Card Length Up to 380mm
Water Cooling Radiator Front:  up to 280mm Top: up to 360mm
Power Supply Location Rear Bottom
RGB  Light Effects 2x Hurricane RGB Fans RGB Logo Plate RGB Front Panel All RGB light effects controlled by external button
Expansion External 5.25" Drive Bays:  1 Internal 2.5" Drive Bays up to 4 (2 with metal tray) 3.5" Drive Bays up to 2 Expansion Slots 7
Front Ports 2x USB 3.0; HD Audio, Mic
Cooling System 2x120mm Azza Hurricane RGB Fan in Front 120mm black fan in rear
Available Fan Ports Front:  2x120mm or 2x140mm Top:  3x120mm or 2x140mm Rear:  1x120mm or 1x140mm
Dimensions (HxWxD) 480x205x475mm or 18.9x8.1x18.7 inch
Weight 6.7kg
Warranty  1 Year
  [caption id="attachment_198461" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Internal Packaging[/caption] The packaging of the case itself isn't very exciting to look at, however I did want to point out that while Azza uses standard plastic foam blocks to protect the case, the blocks are reinforced with a cardboard layer. [caption id="attachment_198572" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Accessory Pack[/caption] Azza includes a very small accessory pack with the Inferno 310, the required screws, standoffs, and user manual are all here.  The user manual is pretty simple, providing some exploded views of the case components, information on the front I/O panel, graphics card and hard drive installation, and various cooling options.  Without any additional cable ties, cable management will be little more of a challenge. Let's take a look around the Azza Inferno 310 before open it up and build a system in it.

Azza Inferno 310 Exterior

[caption id="attachment_198560" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case[/caption] The Azza Inferno 310 is only offered in the one configuration, solid black with the tempered glass side panel.  However the RGB accents and fans will allow you to easily customize the case to your specific color needs.  Taking a quick look at the case, we find the finish to be flawless.   The front of the case is pretty plain, there is a door on the front that covers the hidden 5.25" device bay, and rather than it being a plain rectangle door, Azza has given it a bit of a different shape to enhance the RGB accent bar built into the door.  Beneath the door we can see the two intake 120mm RGB Hurricane fans, behind a metal mesh.  At the very bottom of the front panel, Azza has placed their name on the case in big bright white letters. [caption id="attachment_198561" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Front Door Open 5.25" Bay[/caption] One current trend is to get rid of all 5.25" drive bays, there are many reasons people still want 5.25" bays.  Azza has placed one 5.25" device bay on the Inferno 310; it is located behind a large door that also houses some RGB accent LEDs.  This door is held closed by a couple of magnets.  Right above the 5.25" device bay, is the RGB LED controller button (we'll take a closer look at it's functions later). [caption id="attachment_198562" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Front Top Mounted I/O[/caption] On some cases the front I/O cluster is located on the side of the case, or the top panel on the sides; which can make placement of the case very important in order to have easy access to these ports.  Azza has placed the front I/O cluster on the top panel, but at the front of the case.  Making it nearly universally easy to get to the ports.  The front I/O cluster includes the common headphone/microphone jack, two SuperSpeed USB 3.1 Gen 1 ports, and an HDMI port cutout (not populated though).  If you are not familiar with the current VR systems, you need the HDMI port.  The power button is on the left side of the top cluster, placing it right above the front door.   There is one common item missing from the I/O cluster, a reset button. [caption id="attachment_198566" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Tempered Glass Side Panel[/caption] The tempered glass side panel is held in place with four large thumbscrews, and rests on four rubber coated posts.  The rubber coating on the screw posts helps to protect the tempered glass, but also reduce vibration noise that might occur if the rubber coating wasn't there.  While the entire side panel is tempered glass, there is a black edging on it that extends in approximately 3/4 inch. [caption id="attachment_198568" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Top Panel Filter[/caption] [caption id="attachment_198567" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Top Panel With No Filter[/caption] The majority of the top panel is open, allowing for up to additional cooling options.  Instead of just having the wire mesh, Azza has installed a removable filter that snaps into place.  This is easily removed, revealing the mounting slots for either a 3x120mm or 2x140mm fan solution, or up to a 360mm radiator. [caption id="attachment_198569" align="aligncenter" width="448"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Back Panel[/caption] Turning to the back panel, we see the features we expect to find.  There is a fan exhaust that supports either a 120mm or 140mm fan, the motherboard rear I/O port slot, seven PCI expansion slots, and at the bottom the power supply.  There are two additional items to point out.  At the very top of the case is a rectangle punch out hole, which to be honest I don't know what it could be used for.  Above the PCI expansion slots is a cover that makes it a bit more difficult to remove the expansion cards; however, it does have one additional use, by covering up a bit of a gap it allows the expansion slots to be flush with the rest of the case, rather than being indented a little like we usually find.  I noticed two different types of expansion slot covers in use here, the first one is a removable cover, the others are attached to the case and need to be punched out before using the slot.  One downside is if you remove the wrong ones you do not have any additional covers. [caption id="attachment_198570" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Bottom Panel[/caption] Laying the case down, we can take a quick look at the bottom panel.  Here we find four feet that raise the case approximately 1 inch, allowing for the power supply to get plenty of fresh air.  Each of the four feet has a rubber base so the case shouldn't slide around once it's loaded up.  The bottom mounted power supply does have a simple wire mesh filter in place, however it is not easily removable.  Many cases are making the bottom intake filter removable from the back of the case.  This makes it extremely convenient to keep it clean.  Keeping in mind that Azza does everything possible to keep the cost of the case down, this is an easy way to cut a little of the cost while still providing the basic functionality. [caption id="attachment_198942" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Front Panel Removed[/caption] The front panel removed with a slight pull from the bottom of the case; becareful not to pull too hard as there are three sets of wires attached to the front panel.  With the paenl removed, we can see the two 120mm RGB Hurricane fans which are capable of up to 1,800RPM with a maximum airflow of 56.12CFM @ 29.8dB(A).  On the front panel, we can see there is no fine filter between the fans and wire mesh.  The RGB button we saw behind the outside door, connects to the little controller beneath the 5.25 inch bay cover on the front panel.  Speaking of the 5.25 inch bay cover, it is a very simple snap in cover; the 5.25 inch bay itself is ready to go there are no steel covers to remove.  At the very top we have all the wires for the front panel I/O cluster.

Azza Inferno 310 Internal

[caption id="attachment_198581" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Internal View[/caption] Removing the tempered glass side panel is quick and easy, four thumbscrews and you can pull it off; it will sit on the rubber posts, just be aware it could come off by itself.  Taking a quick look, we can see the interior is a uniform color that matches the exterior.  On the motherboard tray, we can immediately notice an oversize hole for installing CPU coolers after installing the motherboard.  To make installing the motherboard easier, Azza has pre-installed a few of the standoffs, be prepared to install one or two others.  There are a total of six additional holes in the tray, three going vertical along the edge of the motherboard, and three at the top horizontal to the motherboard.  Each of these have rolled edges, but no rubber grommets.  Another thing to be aware is that they are fairly narrow, about 3/4 inch wide which should be sufficient to route cables through.  Between the front intake fans and the motherboard area there are two additional places you could install 2.5" drives; however again space will be tight. [caption id="attachment_198582" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Internal 5.25" Device Bay[/caption] The 5.25" device bay has a tool-less clip on one side of the tray, making installation very easy.  The front of the clip has pins that snap into the screw holes on optical drives, if you really want to use screws, there are a couple sets of holes so you can use screws. [caption id="attachment_198583" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Internal Front Intake Fan[/caption] Taking a quick look at the front intake fans, Azza has installed two RGB Hurricane fans, part number FNAZ-12RGB-B; the Hurricane fan is also offered in an all white model (sold separately).  The frame is made up of a translucent acrylic material, allowing the frame to light up from the RGB LEDs.  These RGB LEDs can be controlled either with the included RGB controller, or connected to RGB headers on motherboards.  These are rated for up to 1,800RPM with a maximum air flow of 56.12CFM.  Noise isn't a problem as their maximum noise level is 29.8dB(A).  Both utilize the standard 4-pin PWM connection, in addition to a 4-pin RGB header cable.  Between the fan and the power supply cover there is approximately 1 1/3 inches, which many radiators are pretty close to that exact size; so while you could put a radiator here, it might not be the best location for airflow. [caption id="attachment_198584" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Internal Power Supply Cover[/caption] The power supply, and 3.5" drives are separated from the rest of the case by a cover.  This cover goes from the front to the back of the case, with only two cutouts, the previously mentioned liquid cooler radiator cutout, and a cutout on the top for cable management.  In addition, to help some airflow, there are some vents in the top of the cover.  On the side of the panel, Azza has placed their name, which will light up with RGB LEDs. [caption id="attachment_198726" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Back Motherboard Tray[/caption] Flipping the case around to take a look at the back side, there are a total of three cable tie locations going right up the middle.  Measuring the space we find there is just under 1/2 inch of space for cables. [caption id="attachment_198728" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Power Supply Area[/caption] We have already seen the front, so we know that that power supply is installed on the back side, under the cover.  Taking a quick look, there are four rubber feet which will elevate the power supply for airflow, and they will reduce any potential vibration noise. [caption id="attachment_198737" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - 3.5" Drive Trays[/caption] [caption id="attachment_198738" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - 2.5" Drive Trays[/caption] On the back side, you have the option of installing drives on two plastic 3.5" drive trays (which will also accept 2.5" drives), located between the power supply and the front intake fans.  The other option is to install 2.5" drives on the metal trays, which are located between the power supply and the large hole in the motherboard tray. [caption id="attachment_198739" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - 3.5" and 2.5" Drive Tray[/caption] Both the 3.5" plastic tray and the 2.5" metal tray are familiar designs.  The 3.5" plastic trays are of a toolless design, while the 2.5" metal trays will require screws to secure the drives to them.  Likewise, if you want to install 2.5" drives on the 3.5" trays, you can do that, however you will need to use screws to secure the drives.

Azza Inferno 310 Build

[caption id="attachment_199150" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Completed Build[/caption] For the most part, installing your components inside the Azza Inferno 310 goes as you would expect; there were a few little surprises that we encountered.  Inside the case, we installed an ASUS Prime Z270-A motherboard, with an EVGA GTX 275 graphics card.  There is plenty of room for longer graphics cards, as the Inferno 310 supports graphics cards up to 380mm in length.  We decided to install another 2.5 inch drive on the front side of the case, just to show it is possible.  However cabling is a big challenge for the drive, as the connectors are pretty close to the SATA connectors on the motherboard. [caption id="attachment_198965" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Power Supply Cover Hole Space[/caption] After the motherboard is installed, we started installing the necessary cables.  That's when we started finding a few things that made us need to rethink the build.  For example, once the motherboard is installed, the cable routing hole on the power supply cover isn't large enough to route PCIe cables through it.  Between the bottom connectors and the cover there is approximately .25 inch to squeeze the PCIe power connector through, which is about half the space needed. [caption id="attachment_199152" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - PCIe Cable Routing[/caption] In order to get the PCIe power cables to the graphics cards, you have a few options.  First, you can route them through the hole on the power supply cover prior to installing the motherboard.  Next, you can route them in the space by the front intake fans.  Finally, you always have the option to route them behind the tray and to come out in the holes in the motherboard tray. [caption id="attachment_199148" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Back Side Cables[/caption] There isn't a lot of room for cables, and the lack of cable tie locations might might doing a great job at cable management a little difficult.  Re-using the twist ties can make it a little better; other than the one twist tie at the top, and the slight routing of the 8-pin motherboard power cable there hasn't been any further cable management done.  Also, despite the small amount of space, the side panel goes into place without any difficulty. [caption id="attachment_198963" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - No Screws on Right Side of SSD[/caption] [caption id="attachment_198964" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Two SSD Install with Screws[/caption] Installing 2.5 inch drives onto the metal drive trays is easy, however I quickly noticed a potential for an issue with the included screws.  The two drive cages get installed with very little room between them, so installing two drives with screws on both sides, there is an issue installing the trays.  If you look at the picture with the two SSD's installed, you can see that the tray on the right will not line up with the slots on the motherboard tray or the thumbscrew hole.  The only way to get them to install is to use flat head screws (which aren't included).  Otherwise, don't put screws on one of the sides, of course then your drive isn't totally secure, but shouldn't be an issue.  Something else I noticed, is that the 2.5 inch drives hang a little over the power supply, which will make it a little more difficult to install the power supply if the drives are in place first; install the power supply prior to installing 2.5 inch drives. [caption id="attachment_198962" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Power Supply Cable Space[/caption] If you happen to be using a modular power supply, you will really want to think out the cables you will be using.  Between the edge of the power supply and the 3.5 inch drive cage there is approximately 2 inches of space.  That doesn't leave a lot of room to manipulate cables, so connect the necessary cables prior to installing the power supply to make your life easier. Built In LED Controller Functions There are three LED functions built into the included controller, Solid, Fade In/Out and Flashing.  In addition, it only provides the option to use seven colors, Red, Green, Yellow, Pale Blue (almost White), Blue, Orange, and Purple.  The Fade In/Out and Flashing functions, will automatically rotate through the seven colors depending on the selected mode. Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case The LEDs are bright and vibrant, the accent bar and RGB Hurrican fans look great.  The Azza logo on the side looks great as well, however it is only lit by two LEDs on the sides so the color isn't even across the entire logo. [caption id="attachment_199153" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - BitFenix Alchemy 2.0 RGB LED Strip[/caption] Azza has included two additional connectors for additional RGB items.  You can connect RGB LED strips, or additional fans.  We happened to have BitFenix's Alchemy 2.0 Magnetic RGB Strip available.   All the functions provided by the included controller work with the RGB LED strip.  If you have a motherboard with a RGB header and you have the necessary cables, you could connect the RGB connections to the motherboard, controlling them through that software.

Final Thoughts and Conclusions

The Azza Inferno supports all the necessary components to make a powerful gaming system.  For storage, you have space to install up to six 2.5 inch drives or two of those can be 3.5 inch drives instead.  There is a 5.25 inch device bay that can be used for an optical drive, additional drives or other 5.25 inch device. [caption id="attachment_199150" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Completed Build[/caption] Graphics cards can be up to 380mm in length, while the CPU cooler can be either air or liquid cooling.  If you choose to go with an air cooler, you are limited to coolers that are less than 155mm.  Of course you can go with liquid coolers, which the Inferno 310 supports up to 360mm at the top, 280mm in the front or 120mm in the rear. [caption id="attachment_199158" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case` Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Green LED[/caption] The current trend is to have Tempered Glass on cases.  This gives the cases a high quality feel compared to either solid metal or acryllic panels.  There are cases with Tempered Glass on all the panels, some one several sides, and some just put Tempered Glass on one panel.  This is what Azza has done with the Inferno 310.  They have replaced the main side panel with Tempered Glass, while leaving the other panels metal or plastic.  Doing this gives the case a nice high quality aesthetic feel, while still keeping the price down.  Plus with a solid back side panel, you don't have to be as concerned with how your cables look.  Overall, I really like how the Azza Inferno 310 looks with the Tempered Glass side panel. [caption id="attachment_199159" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Lights Out with Blue LEDs[/caption] One of the key selling points of the Inferno 310 is the included RGB controller and RGB components.  Azza has included two of their RGB Hurricane fans in the front, an RGB accent bar on the door hiding the 5.25 inch bay, and their logo on the power supply shroud.  The included RGB controller is pretty basic, it supports only seven colors and three functions.  Of course you have the option to skip the RGB controller and connect all of the RGB elements to your motherboard.  Azza has also provided two addition RGB headers to connect additional RGB fans or LED light strips to the RGB controller. The only problem is that you can't buy any extra Azza Hurricane fans as they aren't on the market just yet. Azza hopes to get Newegg to carry the fans soon, but doesn't have an exact date for us as to when they'll be available. [caption id="attachment_198964" align="aligncenter" width="645"]Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case Azza Inferno 310 Mid-Tower Case - Two SSD Install with Screws[/caption] While building a system inside the Azza Inferno 320, there were several things that I felt needed to be addressed.  The first is the intake fans, not having a filter on the front panel is going to cause the interior of the case to get dusty fairly quick.  Next, the incorrect screws are included for the 2.5 inch trays, if you happen to have flat head screws you won't run into any issues.  However, I feel they should've been included with the Inferno 310.  Finally, the last concern is the size of the cable management holes, they will fit the necessary cables as long as you plan for them.  In particular the hole on the power supply cover, if you plan to use this for PCIe cables, you'll want to run those cables before installing the motherboard. The Azza Inferno 310 is currently available online for $89.99 with free shipping; in addition until 10/23/2017 there is a 10% promo code available and there is also a $20 rebate available until 10/31/2017.  For this price there is a wide range of ATX cases available however there aren't many ATX cases that offer Tempered Glass side panels, RGB fans and a RGB controller. If you can find the Azza Inferno 310 case for around $61 shipped like it is right now with all the promotions we find that this case packs a really good value! Legit Reviews Value Award Legit Bottom Line: The Azza Inferno is well built and a great looking case.  When building a system you'll want to plan out your install so you do not have to uninstall components in order to get everything done exactly how you want.