Kingston's 34nm 40GB Boot Drive

Kingston has been offering Solid-State Drives (SSDs) to consumers since they introduced their SSDNow family of drives back at the 2009 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. The first two products in its SSDNow line of SSDs were the SSDNow E Series and SSDNow M Series. Kingston targeted its SSDNow E Series to the enterprise server environment while the SSDNow M Series was built for the road warrior who demanded the ultimate performance from a notebook PC. The Kingston SSDNow E and M Series use Intel’s first generation 50nm solid-state drive technology, which was the best on the market back in January 2009. We published an in-depth review of the Kingston 80GB SSDNow M Series drive and found it to be on the same performance level as the Intel X25-M 80GB SSD that we previously reviewed. The SSDNow M and E series drives were fast, but more expensive than what mainstream consumers were willing to pay.

Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive

Kingston next went for the mainstream market and launched the SSDNow V Series SSDs with what they called upgrade bundles during Computex Taipei in June of 2009. The SSDNow V series was targeted specifically for mass-market consumers and small and medium businesses. The Kingston SSDNow V Series also featured upgrade bundles for either notebooks or desktop users. These low-cost, value-driven SSD solutions were designed to increase performance on existing desktops and notebooks while giving consumers an easy way to backup their data and to install the drives in their systems. The SSDNow V series had two limitations, though.  They only were available in 128GB and 64GB capacities and they also featured the JMicron JMF602 controller that isn't the best performing controller on the market by any means and was known to stutter when multi-tasking. Kingston worked with JMicron and Toshiba to develop a firmware work-around that removed the stutter issue at the cost of some performance. When we reviewed the Kingston SSDNow V Series 128GB drive in July of 2009 we found the drive to be a great value, but the random write performance was a little lacking. With an inexpensive controller and no cache on the SSD, this was to be expected, but it was still a solid and inexpensive SSD that was great for most consumers to get their feet wet with a product they more than likely never owned before.

Just two short months later in August of 2009, Kingston released an SSD known as the SSDNow V+, which features capacities of up to 256GB and higher input and output operations per second (IOPS) thanks to a Samsung controller, 128MB cache, and Samsung MLC NAND components. This drive was priced and targeted at prosumers and enterprise companies looking to increase performance and extend the life of existing systems. This drive fits right in the middle of the Kingston SSD line-up and made the Kingston SSDNow series complete from the top to the bottom.  Our review of the Kingston 256GB SSDNow V+ series SSD showed that it was nearly twice as fast as the SSDNow V series and a model was available with a massive 256GB capacity, which is more than any other Kingston SSDNow series drive.

This product stack is fairly simple to understand and each series within the SSDNow family differs by their internals, so you know what you are buying. This fairly simple product stack starts to get a little confusing as Kingston announced this morning a new 40GB 'boot' drive in the SSDNow V series that features the second generation Intel controller with 34nm MLC NAND! As many of you might be aware this is the latest and greatest SSD from Intel and is considered by us and many other reviewers as being the best SSD on the market today.  In fact, the Intel 34nm G2 SSD series is the only SSD that has ever earned the Legit Reviews Editor's Choice award out of the nearly two dozen drives that we have tried out over the past couple of years.
Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive Retail Box

Kingston today announced the release of the SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive, the latest addition to its V (Value) family of solid-state drives (SSD). The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive is said to be one of the best and most cost-effective ways to accelerate any desktop’s boot, shutdown and application load times. The best price of the drive is that it is available for as low as $84.99 after rebates (U.S. only) at e-tailer Newegg.com when it begins shipping on November 9, 2009.

Kingston SSDNow 40GB Boot Drive Features and Specifications:

The SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive comes rated with impressive sequential read speeds of up to 170MB/sec. and mediocre write speeds of up to 40MB/sec. This drive should not be mixed up with the original Kingston SSDNow V series and it should really be called the SSDNow M+ Series, but hey, LR doesn't get to make the names up. The drive has all new internals and is a much better and improved drive, but let's take it apart and test it before we jump to conclusions!

40GB Boot Drive Unboxing

Kingston SSDNow V Series 128GB Drive

 

Today, we will be looking at the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive Desktop Bundle Kit (part number SNV125-S2BD/40GB). Kingston has added all the hardware and software necessary to replace your current desktop computer's internal SATA hard drive thanks to the Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive (SSD) Bundle Kit. 

Kingston SSDNow 40GB V Series Boot Drive Offerings:

If you don't need anything other than a bare drive Kingston also has a stand-alone sku available that is $15 less expensive.
Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive Bundle Kit

Inside the cardboard box is another plastic container that holds all the components.  Notice Kingston put a RedHead on the plastic housing.

Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive Bundle Kit

The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB SATA 2.5 boot drive desktop bundle kit includes the SSDNow V Series drive, Serial ATA data cable, 4-pin Molex to Serial ATA power adapter cable, a drive mounting bracket w/screws for 2.5” to 3.5” conversion and a CD with some critically needed software on it. 

Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive Bundle Kit

The heart of the bundle is Acronis True Image HD software, an imaging program that copies the contents of one computer hard disk and loads those contents to another system drive; that will take you through the cloning process. This software allows you to move your Operating System and your personal data (including all settings, emails, etc.) from your current system hard drive to your new SSD. Once the Acronis True Image HD cloning process is complete and the data is successfully transferred to your SSD, your hard drive can then be used as a secondary drive for data storage with the included external SATA drive housing. The Acronis True Image software is valued at $46.99 on its own, so for an MSRP that is $15 higher the bundle seems like a good value if you need the software and mounting brackets. If you would like to know more about what exactly this software does please refer back to this article where we go in-depth on the software and how to use it.

Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive Bundle Kit

The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB SATA drive uses the 2.5" form factor used in notebooks, so this drive will work in any notebook or desktop (with the adapter rails). The SSDNow V Series uses less power than traditional hard drives as it consumes just 0.15 Watt during active use and 0.06 Watt in a sleep state. This is good news for laptop and netbook users as you will see better battery life and desktop users will see less heat and more power savings.


Kingston SSDNow Solid State Drive Bundle Kit

Flipping the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB SSD over you get a better look at the back of the drive.  Notice that it has threaded mounting holes on both the bottom and sides to fit in various cases.

Kingston SSDNow SNV125-S2BD/128GB SATA

Here is a better look at the SATA II header and the SATA power connector. The SATA 2 storage interface is backwards-compatible with SATA 1. For maximum performance, Kingston recommends installing Vboot drive on a SATA 2 controller and enabling ‘AHCI’ mode in the BIOS.

Let's take a look inside the drive and see what makes it tick.

Inside The SSDNow V Series Drive

Since we know the Kingston SSDNow V series 40GB boot drive has Intel components inside we opened up our test sample to make sure and to see what the internals look like.

Kingston SSDNow V+ Series 256GB SSD

After removing the four Allen head screws that hold down the Kingston SSDNow V Series cover we were able to lift off the cover and see what makes this little SSD tick. With the cover removed, we were able to see a green PCB that didn't have any MLC NAND Flash components on it, but that is just this side of the drive.


Toshiba TH58NVG6D1DTG20 MLC NAND Flash

Taking the drive out of the housing and flipping it over we can finally see the good stuff!  The drive uses five Intel 8GB flash packages, which means it really has 40GB of actual space on it.

Toshiba TH58NVG6D1DTG20 MLC NAND Flash

Here is a closer look at the Intel MLC NAND Flash memory that is being used on the drive. This 40GB SSD consists of five Multi-Level Cell (MLC) components that are made by Intel and have part number 29F64G08CAMD1 etched on the top of them. This drive with these chips is pretty much bullet proof as it has an operating vibrating tolerance of 2.17G (7-800Hz)! The non-operating vibration tolerance is 20G (20-200Hz), which is amazing when you think about how much force that would be.

Kingston SSDNow V+ Series 256GB Drive Samsung Controller

The heart and soul of all Kingston V Series 40GB Boot Drive SSD is the Intel controller pictured above. The first generation drives used an Intel branded controller with the part number PC29AS21AA and the new second generation drivers use an Intel branded controller with the part number PC29AS21BA0. The controller was changed for a number of reasons, but you can bet that performance and added features is the number one reason for going to a new controller. The new controller architecture still employs the same 10 parallel NAND Flash channels used in the original controller but can now support features like TRIM.

Legit Reviews asked Intel if TRIM would ever be supported in the first generation Intel SSDs and they stated that "No TRIM support for 50nm Intel SSD drives is planned at this time".  So, you would think that this drive would support the TRIM command in Windows 7, right? Well, the drive shipped to us with Firmware 02G9, which is a non-TRIM supporting firmware that was released by Intel back in August 2009. We tried to flash the drive firmware version 02HA, which is the TRIM supporting firmware, but we got this error message when using the Intel Firmware Update Tool. 

Kingston SSDNow V+ Series 256GB Drive Samsung Controller

As you can see, the proprietary Intel Firmware Update Tool would not work since the Kingston SSDNow V series 40GB boot drive has Kingston as the manufacturer in the firmware. Since Kingston hasn't yet released a firmware update utility, we were unable to get the TRIM supporting firmware on the drive. We tried to cheat by trying to get the Intel utility to work, but the Kingston drive doesn't work with Intel's utility. This means that the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive does not currently support the TRIM command even though the hardware does support the feature.

We asked Kingston if this specific drive would support TRIM and got the following answer:

Kingston: "Currently, the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive does not support TRIM. However, we will have it for this drive as it is on our road map." - Kingston PR

From this answer we can make an educated guess and say that the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive will support TRIM with a future firmware update. This will likely happen after Intel has officially launched their own 40GB X25-M drives with TRIM down the road. This is a small negative, but at least you should be able to get TRIM support down the road. Upgrading from firmware version 02G9 to version 02HA on the Intel G2 drives was non-destructive, so we can only assume that the update for the Kingston SSDNow V series 40GB boot drive would be as well.

Kingston SSDNow V+ Series 256GB SSD

Below the Intel controller is a single 32MB Micron 133MHz SDRAM that is used for the cache of the drive. The chip is labeled 48LC16M16A2-75.

The life expectancy of the Kingston SSDNow V series drives is 1.0 million hours mean time before failure (MTBF). This means that the drive should easily live longer than the 3-year warranty that comes with it. Kingston Technology backs their SSDs with 24/7 tech support on top of the three-year warranty, which is nice when you need help during odd hours or on the weekend.

The Test System

Before we look at the numbers, here is a brief glance at the test system that was used. All testing was done on a fresh install of Windows Vista Ultimate 64-bit. All benchmarks were completed on the desktop with no other software programs running. The Intel Core i7 test system was run in triple-channel memory mode at 1866MHz with 8-8-8-24 memory timings. The ASUS P6T Deluxe V2 motherboard uses the Intel ICH10R south bridge chipset, which is what was used for testing.

Kingston SSD Test Drive


Intel LGA 1366 Test Platform

Component

Brand/Model

Live Pricing

Processor

Core i7 975 Extreme

Motherboard

ASUS P6T Deluxe V2

Memory

6GB Corsair DDR3 1866MHz

Video Card

ATI Radeon HD 4770

Hard Drive

WD VelociRaptor

Cooling

TRUE

Power Supply

CoolerMaster UPC 1100W

Operating System

Windows Vista Ultimate 64-Bit

SSDs Included in the Benchmarking

Hard Drives Included in the Benchmarking

Let's take a look at the benchmarks and see what the Kingston 40GB Boot Drive has to offer!

HD Tach v3.0.4.0

HD Tach is a low level hardware benchmark for random access read/write storage devices such as hard drives, removable drives (ZIP/JAZZ), flash devices, and RAID arrays. HD Tach uses custom device drivers and other low level Windows interfaces to bypass as many layers of software as possible and get as close to the physical performance of the device possible.

HD Tach Benchmark Results

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive is only rated to have a sequential read of 170MB/s, but you can see that that rating is very conservative. We were able to reach an average read speed of 231.5MB/s, which is the fastest read speed we have ever seen on an SSD. The average write speed on the SSD was only 43.5MB/s, which is due to the fact that the drive has just five MLC Flash chips and isn't using all the controller's channels. This is very interesting!  This benchmark was done on the brand new drive, so performance degradation is not an issue here and this is as good as it gets.

HD Tach Benchmark Results

Comparison Chart: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive has the fastest read speed we have ever seen, but it also had the lowest write speed ever seen on an SSD. The burst speed was awesome, which is expected on Intel based drives. The results of HD Tach's CPU utilization test don't mean much as the application has a +/- 2% margin of error and the results of the benchmark range between 0-3%, which doesn't represent a significant difference.

HD Tune v3.50

HD Tune Pro 3.50 is an extended version of HD Tune which includes many new features such as write benchmark, secure erasing, AAM setting, folder usage view, disk monitor, command line parameters and file benchmark.

HD Tune File Benchmark

HD Tune File Benchmark

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive does great again in HD Tune Pro 3.50 in the read test, but is slow in the write test.  The spikes in the write benchmark look strange, but the average is 40.7MB/s, which is what the drive is rated at. After all is said and done, the average read speed was found to be 207.6MB/s.  Both tests had an access time of 0.1ms and a CPU usage of ~2%. The burst speed was very low on both tests, which is a bit of a mystery as to why this is the case when in HDTach the burst rate was over 255MB/s.

HD Tune Benchmark Results

Comparison Chart: When comparing the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive to other popular 2.5-inch hard drives like the Western Digital Scorpio Blue 500GB and the Seagate Momentus 7200.4 500GB, you can see that it clearly beats them in the read tests, but falls short to a traditional hard drive in the write tests.  The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive was right in the middle of the pack with the other SSDs in this benchmark for the read test. 

64MB File Test

HD Tune File Benchmark

Benchmark Results: Running the built-in file benchmark test in HD Tune showed once again just how the drive performs with various file sizes. This test shows the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB SSD Boot Drive topping out at nearly 185MB/sec in the read tests and 40MB/sec in the write test.

HD Tune v3.50 - Random Access

When HD Tune Pro 3.50 was released in December 2008 it included a brand new Random Access test. The random access read and write test is a very important performance area to look at on solid state drives as some controllers have problems with random writes.

Random Access Read Test Results:

HD Tune Random Access Benchmark

Benchmark Results: When it comes to the random access read performance test the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive does great with the Intel controller and 32MB of cache.

Random Access Write Test Results:

HD Tune Random Access Benchmark

Benchmark Results: The write performance test results of the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive was impressive up to a transfer size of 4KB.  The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive was the fastest drive we have ever seen on the 4KB file size, but then performance nose dived on the larger file sized.  The average access time ranged from 0.05ms to 23ms as you can see from the benchmark results above.

4KB Random Write File Test Results Chart:

HD Tune File Benchmark

Benchmark Results: Many of our readers have asked for a chart showing side-by-side comparisons of the drives we have tested in the 4KB random access write test. You can see from this chart that the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive is the fastest SSD we have ever tested and it also happens to be the lowest price tested.  Amazing!

SiSoftware Sandra 2009 SP3

SiSoftware Sandra (the System ANalyser, Diagnostic and Reporting Assistant) is an information & diagnostic utility. Sandra provides most of the information (including undocumented) you need to know about your hardware, software and other devices whether hardware or software. In order to test the hard drive, SiSoftware Sandra 2009 SP3 was used as part of the test suite. The graphical results that Sandra gives you after the test is completed nicely shows how drives perform over time and where on the drive the performance is seen.

READ Performance Testing:

SiSoftware Sandra 2009 SP3 File Benchmark

WRITE Performance Testing:

SiSoftware Sandra 2009 SP3 File Benchmark

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive  did great in Sandra 2009 SP3 and was found to have an average read score of 221MB/s with a write score of 42MB/s. The read and write access times were just 1ms.

Sandra Benchmark Results

Comparison Chart: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive did fairly well in this benchmark, but it would be nice if the write speeds were a little higher.

CrystalDiskMark v2.2

CrystalDiskMark is a small HDD benchmark utility for your hard drive that enables you to rapidly measure sequential and random read/write speeds.

100MB Files Test:

CrystalDiskMark v2.2 Benchmark

50MB Files Test:

CrystalDiskMark v2.2 Benchmark

Benchmark Results: With Crystal Mark v2.2 run with both a file size of 50MB and 100MB a performance difference can be observed. With the file size at 50MB the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive had slightly higher read speeds in the majority of the benchmarks. 

Crystal Mark Benchmark Results

50MB Files Test Comparison Chart: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive scores near the bottom of the pack in this benchmark.

ATTO Disk Benchmark v2.34

ATTO is one of the oldest hard drive benchmarks that is still used today. ATTO measures transfers across a specific volume length. It measures raw transfer rates for both reads and writes and places the data into graphs that you can easily interpret. The test was run with the default runs of 0.5kb through 8192kb transfer sizes with the total length being 256mb.

ATTO Benchmark Results

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive was able to reach 195MBps on the read test and 44MBps on the write tests.  

ATTO Benchmark Results

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive was able to reach 197MBps on the read test and 44MBps on the write tests when running the Overlapped I/O benchmark.

ATTO Benchmark Results

4MB Files Test Comparison Chart - Overlapped I/O: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive has decent performance numbers in ATTO.

PCMark Vantage

PCMark Vantage Benchmarking

PCMark Vantage is the first objective hardware performance benchmark for PCs running 32- and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Windows Vista. PCMark Vantage is perfectly suited for benchmarking any type of Microsoft Windows Vista PC from multimedia home entertainment systems and laptops to dedicated workstations and hi-end gaming rigs. Regardless of whether the benchmarker is an artist or an IT Professional, PCMark Vantage shows the user where their system soars or falls flat, and how to get the most performance possible out of their hardware. The PCMark Vantage benchmark was run in 64-bit mode for the results shown below.

PCMark Vantage Benchmark Results

Benchmark Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive had an overall score of 25,101 and the individual test results can be seen in the image above. These are very solid performance numbers!

PCMark Vantage Benchmark Results

Comparison Chart Results: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive had great individual test scores, but the overall score seemed a little low. We are not sure why the individual test scores beat many of the other drives that have a higher overall score unless the capacity of the drive is taken into consideration in the overall score. The Kingston press release for this drive states they scored 13,883 in the Vantage Advanced HDD Suite. This score greatly differs from ours and when we contacted Kingston about this conflict in scores they said this: 

"We conditioned the drive to get that number. Otherwise we got some crazy scores. We wanted to get a score from a drive that was broken in and not brand new, to give users a more realistic perspective." - Kingston

Our response to that is if the drive had TRIM support you don't have to 'condition' the drive to make it well used!

AS SSD Benchmark

A new benchmark is in the works for Solid State Drives - AS SSD Benchmark. We have run this benchmark for several months now and found that it is a great SSD benchmark that shows 4K read and write speeds that so many of our readers want to know about.

BIOS Set To IDE Mode With The Drive As A Secondary:

AS SSD Benchmark Results

BIOS Set To AHCI Mode With The Drive As A Primary:

AS SSD Benchmark Results

Benchmark Results:  The 4K writes were impressive at nearly 20MB/s read and 36MB/s write in IDE mode. The 4K-64Thrd benchmark results were insane in AHCI mode!

BIOS Set To IDE Mode With The Drive As A Secondary:

AS SSD Benchmark Results

BIOS Set To AHCI Mode With The Drive As A Primary:

AS SSD Benchmark Results

Copy Benchmark Results: The Copy benchmark test showed some fairly solid performance numbers.

Capacity and Windows 7

Kingston SSDNow 128GB Actual Capacity

When it comes to storage capacity, the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB SSD has a free capacity of 37.2GB as shown above. This is not that much space, but it should be fine for a boot drive according to Kingston.

Kingston SSDNow 128GB Actual Capacity

Just for fun we installed Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit and found that the base install without any updates or utilities installed was 17.5 GB. This means that less than half the drive is being used, which is very nice and Windows 7 leaves a much smaller installation foot print than one might think.

Windows 7 Pagefile Size with 6GB of Memory

** Update: One sharp eyed reader sent in an e-mail calling us out for not pointing out in this section that our test system has 6GB of memory and as a result the our page file size is fairly large as it is based off the amount of installed memory. Microsoft has actually slimmed down the page file size to match the system RAM with the release of Windows 7. Previously, Microsoft allocated “Memory + 300 MB” for the page file, but now it will only grow beyond RAM size if required. So, if you have less memory installed then you will obviously have more space available on your primary drive.

Windows 7 Pagefile Size with 6GB of Memory

You can easily change the size of the total paging file by clicking the 'change' if you'd like to conserve drive space, but as you can see from the screen shot above the recommended paging file size is actually more than Windows 7 defaulted to.

Kingston SSDNow 128GB Actual Capacity

Just for fun we ran the Windows 7 Experience Index to test the key system components and found that the primary hard disk score was a very impressive 7.5!  The highest possible score in the Windows Experience Index is 7.9, so this is a very good sub score!

Final Thoughts and Conclusions

Kingston SSDNow V Series 128GB Drive

The idea of having one drive as a boot drive and another drive for storage is nothing new. Kingston is the first company to bring to market an SSD for this task, though, and we must say that it is an interesting solution. With the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive available for as low as $84.99 after rebates it really might be one of the most cost-effective ways to improve any desktop’s boot, shutdown and application load times. It's not every day a low-cost upgrade solution comes to market that makes such a big performance improvement, so we can see how this SSD will breathe new life into existing desktop computers and workstations in homes and offices around the world. Kingston informed us that the $85 is for just the the standalone drive, and it's for a limited time when the drive launches. Kingston said the length of the discount has yet to set, so if you really want this drive we wouldn't wait too long after it launches on November 9th!

The drive's performance was nothing short of amazing as we were seeing sequential read speeds over 230MB/s in popular benchmarks like HDTach. The drive is rated for a sequential read speed of up to 170MB/s, so this was a nice surprise. The Achilles heel of this product would have to be its write speeds. The drive comes rated at up to 40MB/s for the sequential write speed and that is nothing earth shattering and to be honest, most hard drives can beat that. The 4K random write speeds on the other hand were the best that we have ever seen, so the write performance of the drive is either great or mediocre depending on how you look at it. 

The one feature on this drive that is missing for the time period is TRIM support. For those of you that don't know, the Trim attribute of the Windows 7 ATA Data Set Management Command, often referred to as TRIM, synchs the operating system’s view of deleted files with those that are deleted, but not erased on the drive. TRIM tells the SSD which data blocks are no longer in use. This helps stabilize the performance and health of the SSD over time and is a feature only found on Windows 7. If you don't plan on using Windows 7 then this isn't a missing feature at all. If you plan on running Windows 7, then TRIM will be a key feature to help keep the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive running at a continued high performance level. As we mentioned previously in the article, Kingston said that this feature is planned for down the road, so we can only take their word for that. Intel's TRIM supporting firmware just came out today, so hopefully Kingston's won't be too far behind. 

That being said, the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive is ideal for those looking for a quick and easy way to boost system performance. If the performance numbers alone haven't sold you, keep in mind that SSDs have no moving parts, offer greater energy efficiency and are more durable than traditional HDDs. If you are planning on upgrading to Windows 7 in the near future the Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive should be considered to go along with the new operating system. If you think about it, you can make your current hard drive the storage drive and use this as the primary boot drive. Not a bad deal and for $84.99 after rebates. This is a great SSD to get your feet wet with. The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive might just be the catalyst needed to bring SSDs to the mainstream!

Before you run off searching for drives here is an updated cheat-sheet to help you understand what is inside the various Kingston SSDs:


Legit Reviews Editor's Choice Award

Legit Bottom Line: The Kingston SSDNow V Series 40GB Boot Drive has an inexpensive price tag, but don't let that fool you. It is an Intel 34nm Gen 2 SSD in disguise!