NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti Video Card Roundup – ASUS, MSI and Zotac

Jump To:

Test System

Before we look at the numbers, let’s take a brief look at the test system that was used. All testing was done using a fresh install of Windows 10 Pro 64-bit and benchmarks were completed on the desktop with no other software programs running.  There has been some concern of people testing a cold card versus a hot card, but we’ve always done out testing ‘hot’ since the site started back more than a decade ago.

Video Cards & Drivers used for testing:

  • AMD Crimson 15.12
  • NVIDIA GeForce 361.43

test-system

Intel X79/LGA2011 Platform

The Intel X79 platform that we used to test the all of the video cards was running the ASUS P9X79-E WS motherboard with BIOS 1704 that came out on 05/08/2015. We went with the Intel Core i7-4960X Ivy Bridge-E processor to power this platform as it is PCIe 3.0 certified, so all graphics cards are tested with PCI Express Gen 3 enabled. The Kingston HyperX 10th Anniversary 16GB 2400MHz quad channel memory kit was set to XMP Profile #2. This profile defaults to 2133MHz with 1.65v and 11-13-13-30 2T memory timings. The OCZ Vertex 460 240GB SSD was run with latest firmware available. A Corsair AX860i digital power supply provides clean power to the system and is also silent as the fan hardly ever spins up. This is critical to our testing as it lowers the ambient noise level of the room and gives us more accurate sound measurements.
Test System Settings

Here are the exact hardware components that we are using on our test system:

The Intel X79 Test Platform

Component

Brand/Model

Live Pricing

Processor Intel Core i7-4960X
Motherboard
ASUS P9X79-E WS
Memory
16GB Kingston 2133MHz
Video Card Various
Solid-State Drive OCZ Vertex 460 240GB
Cooling Intel TS13X (Asetek)
Power Supply Corsair AX860i
Operating System Windows 10 64-bit
Monitor Sharp PN-K321 32″ 4K

 

ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti STRIX Gaming 6GB Video Card GPU-Z Info:

asus-980ti

MSI GeForce GTX 980Ti Gaming 6GB Video Card GPU-Z Info:

msi-980ti

Zotac GeForce GTX 980 Ti AMP! Extreme Edition GPU-Z Info:

zotac-980ti-gpuz

GPU
base
clock
(MHz)
GPU
boost
clock
(MHz)
Memory
speed
(MHz)
Idle
GPU
Voltage
Load
GPU
Voltage
Gaming
GPU
clock
(MHz)
ASUS GeForce GTX 980 Ti STRIX OC 6GB 1216 1317 7200 0.861 1.193 1379.5 (+63)
MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti Gaming 6GB 1178 1279 7096 0.881 1.199 1354.2 (+75)
Zotac GeForce GTX 980 Ti AMP! 6GB 1253 1355 7220 0.868 1.193 1442.8 (+88)

Before we get into the test results here are the clock speeds of each card and finally their observed voltages and peak core clock that were shown in GPU-Z 0.8.6 while we were running the benchmarks. The cards boost clock is not the maximum clock speed that the card will run at and thanks to NVIDIA’s GPU Boost 2.0 algorithm you’ll see cards able to go well beyond the rated clock speeds if the parameters are right. This is where a better GPU cooler might come into play as it should allow for higher boost clock speeds. All of the peak clocks we recorded when gaming were 63MHz to 88MHz faster than the cards advertised GPU Boost clocks. Keep this in mind when looking at the performance charts on the following pages.

Let’s move on to the Battlefield 4 benchmark results!

Print
Jump To:
  • MadBlax

    Great review guys.

  • Zampa79

    Asus or Gigabyte?????

    • Jonathan Wakeford

      Gigabyte Xtrem Gaming but maybe you should wait for the new Pascal GPU due in june. Either to buy Pascal, or benefit of the price drop on current gen.

  • mm

    So the nvidia cards are all heavy OC and Fury X is stock?

    • Thomas Olson

      Because the Fury can’t handle an overclock. It’s already pushed as far as it will go from the factory. These are aftermarket cards that come with an overclock over the stock 980 Ti, and they will STILL overclock a good deal beyond that. There’s a reason ATI is cheap. 🙂

      • Arkeo

        Are you living in 2009 or something?

        ATI no longer exists.

        • Thomas Olson

          No shit. Obviously the mocking tone was over your head.

        • Arkeo

          If you meant the ATI acquisition, it was very expensive at over 5 billion.

          Either way, your comment was fanboyish.

        • Thomas Olson

          I meant that ATI was the heyday of the red team. It’s been all downhill since. AMD needs to be careful. They have nothing that can compete currently. Are you afraid of being a fan of things? Even if they’re superior to other things? I’m sorry your life is so sad and dreary. 🙁

        • Arkeo

          Oh really?

          Over half of their cards are very competitive.

          380 crushes the 960 for example. 390 and 970 are pretty comparable. And Fury is as fast/faster than the 980 depending on your luck with the 980. They lose in the flagship segment and they somewhat lose in the $140 segment.

        • ginevraweasely

          Give it a rest A-hole

    • Nathan Kirsch

      I actually started with fresh charts for 2016 and this was all the cards I had time to test and include in the charts before getting onto the plane for CES 2016. I tested the highest clocked Fury X card in the market (1050MHz). I would have happily included an overclocked version if there was such a card that could be bought.

      • Amet Monegro

        ohh ok, everybody overclocks its GPUs lol

    • Amet Monegro

      Nvidia-payed reviews where? lol

    • flippy

      cause hbm cant overclock (yet) and ddr5 can

  • Rauel Crespo

    It was nice seeing your review end with:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B4Km5OKZlp0

    • Nathan Kirsch

      I cringed when writing that as I knew I’d get flamed! There really just isn’t a perfect card that is right for everyone IMO.

  • Rauel Crespo

    You should have thrown in the Titan-X for good measure, as well as two GTX970’s in SLI to see what a similar amount of money gets you in performance.

    Also, I’ll take the sheer Titan-X killing performance of the Zotac card for the pennies extra it’ll add to my power-bill every year over the other two. Seriously, even comparing the power figure of the 390x vs the GTX970 is at most $5-$12 extra a YEAR.

    • Nathan Kirsch

      yup, it’s really not that bad when it comes to the power bill as you aren’t gaming at those numbers 24/7. Another benefit is that the card will help keep your room warm in the winter.