AMD Ryzen Balanced Power Plan Benchmarked

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AMD & Intel Test Systems

AMD Ryzen Test System

The AMD AM4 platform that we used to test the Ryzen 7 1700 was running the MSI X370 Xpower Gaming Titanium motherboard with UEFI 1.30. The processor was overclocked to 4.00 GHz on all cores with 1.3875V set for the CPU Core voltage. The Corsair Vengeance 16GB 4000MHz DDR4 dual channel memory kit was manually set to 2933MHz with 14-14-14-28 1T memory timings as we wanted to test with one of the most popular clock frequencies sold today. We used an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB Founders Edition video card with GeForce 378.78 WHQL drivers. We also used the Corsair AX860i digital power supply, Corsair Hydro Series H110i water cooler and Corsair Force MP500 480GB PCIe SSD on the system.

AMD AM4 Test Platform

Component

Brand/Model

Live Pricing

Processor

AMD Ryzen 7 1700

Motherboard

MSI X370 XPower Titanium Click Here

Memory

16GB Vengeance 3000MHz DDR4 Click Here

Video Card

GeForce GTX 1080 FE Click Here

Hard Drive

Corsair MP500 480GB Click Here

Cooling

Corsair H110i Click Here

Keyboard

Corsair K70 RGB Click Here

Mouse

Corsair M65 Pro Click Here

Power Supply

Corsair AX860i Click Here

Monitor

ASUS PB287Q 4K Click Here

Operating System

Windows 10 64-Bit Click Here

Core i7-7700K Test System Picture

The Intel Z270 platform that we used to test the Intel 1151 processors was running the Gigabyte Aorus Z270X-Gaming 5 with UEFI F5e that came out on 12/28/2016. The Corsair Vengeance 16GB 4000MHz DDR4 dual channel memory kit was manually set to 3000MHz with 15-15-15-36 1T memory timings as we wanted to test with one of the most popular clock frequencies sold today. We used an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 8GB Founders Edition and GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB Founders Edition video card with GeForce 378.78 WHQL drivers.  We also used the Corsair AX860i digital power supply, Corsair Hydro Series H105 water cooler and Crucial MX300 1050GB SSDs on the system.

Intel LGA1151 Test Platform

Component

Brand/Model

Live Pricing

Processor

Intel Core i7-7700K

Motherboard

Gigabyte Z270X-Gaming 5 Click Here

Memory

16GB Vengeance 3000MHz DDR4 Click Here

Video Card

GeForce GTX 1080 FE Click Here

Hard Drive

Crucial MX300 1050GB Click Here

Cooling

Corsair H105 Click Here

Keyboard

Corsair K70 RGB Click Here

Mouse

Corsair M65 Pro Click Here

Power Supply

Corsair AX860i Click Here

Monitor

ASUS PB287Q 4K Click Here

Operating System

Windows 10 64-Bit Click Here

Another thing to note is that we will be testing on 3DMark Fire Strike and five game titles. The games selected were done at random and from our own picking based on release dates.

Thief: February 25, 2014
Grand Theft Auto V: April 14, 2015
Fallout 4: November 10th, 2015
Deus Ex: Mankind Divided: August 23rd, 2016
Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Wildlands: March 7, 2017

These five game titles span the past three years and use both DX11 and DX12 API’s. We wanted to show CPU/GPU performance on new and old game titles, so we think these covers do that well.

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  • RedHoodTwo

    Is there a Ryzen High Quality/Performance plan?

  • gr33nbits

    Is it better to use Ryzen Balanced power plan or High Performance power plan? I got a Ryzen 5 1600 and installed the chipset drivers so i have Ryzen Balanced power plan available and selected, should i keep it or use the Windows 10 High Performance?

  • Billy Williams

    This helps out mostly with general feel of the OS. To me it feels a little snappier. Also I had some pausing while typing in VMs and this seems to resolve that issue.

  • DF86

    I really hope devs start optimizing for Ryzen as the power is there as the Ashes of the Singularity patch has proven, There is no reason other than lack of optimization that at 1440P a 7700K at stock should get 30-40FPS more than an 8C16T Ryzen chip.

  • testing 4 games concludes NOTHING. 20 games concludes something.

  • Greg Bryett

    Wish I could install this. I keep getting provisioning failure!

  • PC Master

    “Plan, but it appears to help out significantly in two of the five game titles that we managed to benchmark today and those titles woult be GTA V and Thief.”

    Time and time again I either see typos, spellings errors or poor grammar from LegitReview articles.

    Do you idiots even proof read before posting your articles?

    • they make a conclusion of benchmarking 5 games and you want them to have a good grammar? i meant cherry picked games, those are the worst games on the first page list compared to battlefield 1 (very played) and crysis 3 (benchmark game of the most powerful engine).

  • H23

    Wish you would use better RAM. Trident Z 3200 14 cast works on almost all Ryzen boards.

  • Nen

    In balanced mode, at idle, the frequency should go down to 2ghz. With the new plan, the idle frequency remain high at p1 of 3.2ghz, just like in the high performance plan. Amd renamed high performance plan to “balanced ryzen” and you fell for it.

    • Bruno_O

      From AMD’s post:
      Finally, if you see a third-party tool reporting “idle” clocks in the range of 3200-3400MHz, you can be virtually certain that the core is actually sleeping and the tool is simply reporting the last known P-State.

  • K1W1Pyro

    Would be interesting to see the results with new MSI 1.3 BIOS loaded as well which increases gaming performance as seen here
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HX_WEvEzR64

    • Nathan Kirsch

      1.3 was used here and no it didn’t increase gaming performance by much at all.

      • ELLAS

        Bios updates increase system stability, memory compatability, more stable over clocks, and overall enhancements and optimizations. Will it increase gaming performance. Probably, but not this early IMO. Game developers can optimize for Ryzen though game patches and updates.

      • That’s your opinion, mine based on more games not just 4 cherry picked ones is it does increase performance.

      • I also wanna point that the 1700 offers better gaming performance. No i’m not looking at average framerate but 1% and 0.1% lows, those are better on ryzen and makes a smoother experience. That is more important for hardcore gaming. Another thing is, as a hardcore gamer, i use, while playing guild wars 2 for example, browser (two of them) many tabs to search info, overwolf, discord app, shadowplay, msi afterburn and some other software. music player sometimes and youtube videos in the background. Many of this actively while playing the game. It’s not something particular, it’s something any hardcore gamer does today. You play and have many things behind running and you use them. Some of this are needed for the game performance itself like searching information about the game, or talking to team mates. Doing all this will have an impact on a 7700k, it wont on ryzen.

        Oh also playing with a gtx 1080 or 1080ti at 1080p doesn’t make sense as having a 7700k with a mid range card doesn’t either.

        Based on all this and what ryzen does in everything else besides gaming, (50% faster than 7700k) yeah, i’m pretty sure Ryzen is something better for gamers than intel.

        My lecture on this case at least is this.

  • Conclusion : even with the new Power Plan that favors Ryzen, AMD is still behind in terms of gaming performance. It is up to developers to bring the optimization for newer games. Hopefully, they wouldn’t mind doing it to bring the balance of the force in PC gaming.

    • Nandiman

      Also, has anyone checked the power consumption with the new power plan? Because if it barely adds performance but significantly decreases efficiency than it’s a double bust (though I doubt it would be significantly affected, but I am curious.

    • ELLAS

      Agreed. But Ryzen gets more than enough playable frame rates. And it guarantees the user smooth game play, regardless of frame rates. That’s where Ryzen is strong at. 7700K looks like a beast, but the in-game micro stuttering that CPU causes in many games would irritate me.

    • behind? lower frames are better on ryzen and makes it have less stutter than a 7700k.